© 2019 by Yuri Woodstock
Jupitercommunitychoir@gmail.com
(828) 489 4240
Celo, North Carolina

Practice Tracks

~A note on cultural appropriation~


•Recordings are for your ears only! Do not disseminate.  For real.  It's illegal.•

•And bare with me on some of these, they're quite imperfect.  Sometimes its flat by the end of the recording, or my voice is straining.  But I hope these rough cuts get the basic parts across!•

•There will be a growing number of tracks on here as the season progresses. I suggest 

                                   1.  Create a shortcut to his page on your desktop
                                   2. Use the search function to find the song you're looking                                          for.  ctrl. + F or cmmd. + F 



**In the Beginning was the Seed  and Generosity by Annie Zylstra ( the one about flowers, "Bright, reaching up..."  Have great recordings on her website, Heartland Harmony. All her originals are solid gold!!**

Milkweed Silk - Heidi Wilson
00:00 / 00:00

A hypnotic and earthy offering from Heidi Wilson.  Milkweed pods, edible when young, release a voluptuous unfurling of silken seed in the Autumn, and I chose it for the Spring session because it reflects our going out into the world in all our doings...

 

Go wind
 
carry us now
like milkweed silk
and send us out
send us out

 

Roll the Old Chariot Along or Nelson's Blood - Traditional Shanty
00:00 / 00:00



We'll Roll the ol' chariot along,
We'll Roll the ol' chariot along,
We'll Roll the ol' c
hariot along,
And we'll all hang on behind!

A pot of Irish stew
Wouldn't do us any Harm x3
...And we'll all hang on behind!

We'll Roll... Etc.

A classic capstan shanty.  African American in origin, there are early records of it being sung at corn shuckings and log rollings in the Dismal Swamp area of Georgia.  The words come from a Salvation Army Hymn, and the tune is a Scottish reel. In some versions, the biblical "golden wheel" replaces the chariot. The verse about Nelson's blood It is making reference to the aftermath of the battle of Trafalgar, (1805) in which Admiral Lord Nelson died, and his body was placed in a barrel of rum.  The crew was said to have drunk grog in honor of Nelson, out of that very barrel, and thereon grog was sometimes known as "Nelson's Blood".



We'll Roll the ol' chariot along,
We'll Roll the ol' chariot along,
We'll Roll the ol' c
hariot along,
And we'll all hang on behind!

A pot of Irish stew
Wouldn't do us any Harm x3
...And we'll all hang on behind!

We'll Roll... Etc.

John Kanaka - Traditional Shanty
00:00 / 00:00

A Halyard Shanty from the South Pacific, or at least the name is.  Hawaiian sailors were renowned for their excellent seamanship.  Sometimes their names were hard for English speakers to pronounce, and the Hawaiian word for man, "Kanaka" was used. Great to sing in excitement for a day off, but as with many shanties, it can be about anything.

The First Snow - Unknown Artist
00:00 / 00:00

Dreamy round that embodies the feeling of silent magical snow world.  Still searching for the origins...

The first snow falls so silently down,
that none can hear it touch the ground 
and still it falls, and falls, and falls.



 




I heard, I heard the old man say
John Kanaka-naka tulai e
Today, today is a holiday
John Kanaka-naka tulai e

Tulai e -woah- tulai e
John Kanaka-naka tulai e

We're bound away for Frisco Bay,
John Kanaka-naka tulai e
We're bound away at the break of day
John Kanaka-naka tulai e

Tulai e -woah- tulai e

John Kanaka-naka tulai e



 

You and I - Laurence Cole
00:00 / 00:00

Based on the words of environmentalist writer Winona LaDuke, this song is a gentle but powerful reminder that we are responsible for our part in the care taking of this living breathing earth we are a part of.

Come, Come, Whoever you Are - Rumi Poem
00:00 / 00:00

Joyous and heartening song of welcome and inclusion.  Great for the beginning of a party, conference, etc.  Words are from Jelaluddin Rumi.
 




Come, come, whoever you are
wanderers, worshipers,
lovers of leaving
Ours is no caravan of despair
come, come again, come




 

Che Che Ku Le - Ghana
00:00 / 00:00

A fun gathering song from Ghana.  The words mean" Come back to shore with your boats, it's about to rain." I'll write the lyrics phoenetically.
 

che che ku le
che che ku fi sa
ku fi sa lan ga
kata chi langa
um a day day


You and I
drink this water
You and I
breathe this air
you andI
walk this holy ground.
You and I
Live here


 

Good Friend - Jan Harmon
00:00 / 00:00

I found it! Jan Harmon, 1985. Jan lived 1940-1993 and was a prolific songwriter. This one works as a round or a choral song.  Here is the info from Jan's website.  It is a few notes different from how I learned it.  Here is a recording of it being sung as a round.  I'm excited to do this one during shanty hour...

 

Oh the wind, it is a song
that harbors through the winter.
Oh the sail, it is a door
that bids the song to enter.

So let us sail the seas good friend
and let us sing together.
The singer lasts the season long
but the song, it lasts forever.

We Let it be - Ricki Byars Beckwith
00:00 / 00:00

The epic gospel chorus of a longer song, a powerful reminder to let go. And endlessly goosebump-inducing juicy harmonies! 


 

We let the love wash over us
we let,
we let it be

We let the (Joy) Etc...


Teaching Tracks
 

When I get there - Shared by Ysaye Barnwell
00:00 / 00:00

This is a Gullah song shared with a fellow choir leader by Ysaye Barnwell.  It is an example of a song that could be used as a "Ring Shout", a style of singing and praying and dancing in a circle common among slaves in the west Indies.  A type of Ecstatic prayer. Here is an excellent video about this kind of music.


 

Oh When I get there,
Oh When I get there,
Oh When I get there,
Amen!


Teaching Tracks
 

Yes - Sheikinah Glory Ministry
00:00 / 00:00

This song can strike instant resonance for a lot of people.  It was introdiced to me by Laurence Cole, who simplified this arrangement.  The original is very specifically Christian, though the message of fully saying "yes!" to something is a powerful one, no matter how it lands in your own heart.

 

Stronger Chorus - Helen Yeomans
00:00 / 00:00

The triumphant chorus to Helen Yeoman's Stronger.  I imagine this coule be a pretty powerful protest song.  Here is a sweet rendition inside a huge cathedral.


 

I believe it's stronger.
I believe that love is stronger!
I believe that love is stronger!
I believe that love is stronger!


Teaching Tracks
 

Let me be the love - Karly Loveling
00:00 / 00:00

A powerful insta-song by Eugene-based songstress Karly Loveling.  Put this one in you pocket! Interesting subtle polyrhythms. 

 

• Doin' my best to be the love
my deepest heart is dreaming of
•With every breath I take,
Let me be the love
•Letting my cup overflow


Teaching Tracks
 

E Malama - Brian Kessler -
00:00 / 00:00

This is an earth blessing song in the style of the traditional hula of Hawaii.  The words mean 'Yes, we must do what is right, and take care of the earth.'  This is an example of a type of cultural appropriation similar to 'Kudekukuru', in which an outsider with some familiarity with a musical style composes a Western-style choral piece based on a native song or blessing.  The message, (almost identical to Kudekukuru,) is one of ecological consciousness, and while it may be a bit of a white guy wanna-be song, it's seriously groovy, respectful and aware of the culture it is inspired from, and has a positive intent. The "crunchy chord" at the end is really satisfying!  Here's a video of it being performed.

 

E Malama i ka heiau x3
E malama pono I ka heiau 
eeee


Teaching Tracks

 

Tibyeh Pieyom - Russian Liturgical Hymn
00:00 / 00:00

This is a magical song with a magical lineage.  It is an old Christian hymn that means, roughly, "To you we are singing, we are blessing you.  We thank God and pray to you, Lord our God."  And I encourage taking lightly the somewhat staunch translation that has been passed down.  This is a song of ultimate praise and gratitude for life, and its harmonies are out of this world.  It was passed to me by Laurence Cole, who received it from one of his mentors, Siobhan Robinsong, who received it from one of the founders of the Natural Voice Network, Nick Prater.  There is a story that Laurence's choir sang it at an old folks' home in Port Townsend, and on their way out, a nurse with a Russian accent came rushing out, "Please, please, come sing it again to my father! He cannot leave his room, but when he heard this song from his childhood there were tears streaming down his eyes!  He wants to hear it again." So they came back and did a bedside rendition to the nurse's father, who was a resident there.  This is an encouraging example of how cultural appropriation can sometimes shelter and transport a potency and depth, even when in foreign hands, to eager ears.  The man hadn't heard the song in something like fifty years...
 

Tibyeh pieyom
tibyeh blagoslovim
tibyeh blagodarim
go spo di
ee molim tibyeh bojanash x3
go spo di
a men x3


Teaching Tracks

 

Vecherai Rado - Arr. Philip Kutev
00:00 / 00:00

     A traditional Bulgarian song, arranged in the 20th century by Philip Kutev. into a 3-part choral piece.  This one presents an interesting story around cultural appropriation.  Kutev was interested in "preserving" traditional Eastern European music, and succeeded, while simultaneously changing it to fit the modern, Western-competing Soviet ear.  Everything we touch, we change.  Here is a great article that goes into these issues.
     In a nutshell, the whole song is a repetitive back-and-forth between Mari and Rada. "Vecherai Rado...Murivomka iezleza" is Bulgarian for "Have supper Rada, outside with Mari"  And the conversation says, " Have you heard...Rada? people have been talking about me...Rada....saying Ive been knocking..... on doors, Rada....on your door....Rada..."  Pretty funny actually. No resolution. Is it true? 
     We will learn the first three verses this season, and see how far we get! The harmonies are classically Bulgarian and full of droning magic...
  

 

Vecherai rado x3
Muri vomka izlisa

Da si ta pitam x3
muri ti chula li si

za men da gulchot x3
Rado, po tselo selo

Full lyrics here


Teaching Tracks

 

Nungye - Da - Ghana
00:00 / 00:00

A Ghanan greeting song, the words mean, "Surely you are the true child of my mother!", A sweet message of inclusion and tegetherness. It was brought to my singing network by Barbara McAfee, who says it is a song that would be sung all afternoon, then they'd eat dinner, then start it back up again!

 

Nungye-Da
ningye-da ooh
Nungye-da
mma bia
Nungye-da


Teaching tracks

 

Moonlight - Marc Groden
00:00 / 00:00

This song was shared with my by the amazing songstress Aimee Ringle on a beautiful day in Port Townsend.  She had recently sung it to the full moon eclipse with a group of friends on the beach.  To her knowledge, it comes from a choir leader named Marc Groden, who runs a community choir in San Francisco called the Everybody In Choir.  I haven't been able to confirm this.  Wonderful insta-song!  Here's a challenge:  I bet you can learn all four parts AND how they fit together...Just go for it!

 

Moonlight

Teaching tracks

 

Fixed!

Gaudeamus Hodie - Natalie Sleeth
00:00 / 00:00

I learned this song as a foot stompin' round at Catoctin Quaker Camp when I was Nine years old. That's how I have it presented here. Turns out there is actually a written score for Soprano, Alto, and Bass, written in 1972, which can be found here.   Interesting.  It has a calypso rhythmic section... "For Joyous Occasions" . The translation more specifically is "Let us rejoice today."
 


Gaudeamus Hodie

 

Gaudeamus (One Part) -
00:00 / 00:00
Gaudeamus Hodie - Natalie Sleeth
00:00 / 00:00

I learned this song as a foot stompin' round at Catoctin Quaker Camp when I was Nine years old. That's how I have it presented here. Turns out there is actually a written score for Soprano, Alto, and Bass, written in 1972, which can be found here.   Interesting.  It has a calypso rhythmic section... "For Joyous Occasions" . The translation more specifically is "Let us rejoice today."
 


Gaudeamus Hodie

 

Moonlight - Marc Groden
00:00 / 00:00

This song was shared with my by the amazing songstress Aimee Ringle on a beautiful day in Port Townsend.  She had recently sung it to the full moon eclipse with a group of friends on the beach.  To her knowledge, it comes from a choir leader named Marc Groden, who runs a community choir in San Francisco called the Everybody In Choir.  I haven't been able to confirm this.  Wonderful insta-song!  Here's a challenge:  I bet you can learn all four parts AND how they fit together...Just go for it!

 

Moonlight

Teaching tracks

 

Nanila - Republic of Georgia
00:00 / 00:00

This is a lullabye-esque song to our grandmothers. Nanila means grandma, similar words in many languages; and is a classic early baby word.  The strange rise at the end of every other line make this one especially mesmerising.
 

Nanila Nanila
Na Nanila
Nanila
EEH


Teaching Tracks

Djun Djun - Karen Porkka
00:00 / 00:00

A fun and lively nonsense song in 5/4 timing. Written as a loose base to improvise upon by Karen Porkka, a member of the Ubuntu Choirs Network.
 

Djun Djun Gudaka
De De Ga De Ga Dun
De De Ga De Ga Dun
De De Ga De Ga Dun


Teaching Tracks

Humming Round - Nick Prater
00:00 / 00:00

So haunting, this one.  I first learned it from Annie Zylstra at Singing Alive '17. Excellent for experimenting with vowel sounds.  I've seen this one refuse to end in a big group around a fire many times.
 

O Light Abide -
00:00 / 00:00

I learned this song when I was nine. It was sung every night at the end of fire circle as the campers at Catoctin Quaker Camp filed off to their cabins, youngest to oldest.  Instant glorious harmonies.  A powerful classic, adn one to imbue into your lives as a lullabye.  An adaptation of a chrystian hymn, "Abide with us O lord"...
 

O Light Abide - One part -
00:00 / 00:00
Evening Rise -
00:00 / 00:00

There are many arrangements floating around the choral world for this magnificent piece.  It has erroneously been attributed to being a Hopi shamanic song, but this is not correct.  The ocean isn't a common desert peoples theme... It comes from Germany as far as I can tell.  I am going to keep digging.  Enjoy!

 

Evening rise, spirit come
sun goes down when the day is done
mother earth awakens me
with the heartbeat of the sea


Teaching Tracks